Money

When we started this process, E and I talked about how silly it seemed that there is a perception that people “do it for the money.” From my calculations it just seems impossible that anyone could walk away with more money in their pockets rather than less. The stipend that DCF provides to foster parents is on a per child, per day basis, and is really only enough to offset the costs of housing and caring for a child. While we wouldn’t be able to do this at this point in our lives without the stipend, we also know that we will be spending more out of pocket than the stipend covers. That said, we were surprised to find that the stereotypes held true with some folks in our MAPP class. Many of the questions people posed just seemed in poor taste – “if there are 2 caregivers, do both get paid?” … uhhh, you get an amount per child, not per parent … “if I am approved to take a child, can I get an extra bedroom for free?” … sorry what now?

I think you get the point. Anyway I’m sure that, down the road, I’ll be posting about how it all shakes out: what we get help with, what we don’t, and how do-able this all is for two young professionals who work for non-profits. Today, I’m just posting to record the shock I felt at the reminder that there is money involved in this. We discovered a piece of mail from DCF upon our return from my cousin’s wedding. My first thought was that it was our license (finally). When I opened it, I instead discovered a W-9 and a direct deposit form. It’s completely reasonable, of course, that we need to fill out forms and the Department needs a way to deliver the subsidy money for any children in our care. Still, it was surprising to me that I’m filling out forms that I would normally associate with a job. Just another one of the many strange pieces of “the system”

I feel like blog posts are more fun to read when there is a picture, so here’s one of Sheba.
As you can tell, she is entirely uninterested in anything to do with money. As it should be.

20130616-233220.jpg

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Money

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s